This is the TRIAD – The United States of America and Russia and Red China – Iraq, a pawn

This is the TRIAD – The United States of America and Russia and Red China

Just as the Mapai and Mapam parties in Occupied Palestine were both Judaic Zionist Communist knock offs of one another in the beginning of the abomination known as modern Yisrael, so too are the Judaic Zionist controlled shadow governments in Russia and the U.S. Their computers and that of Red China have been linked ever since the Cuban Missile Crisis, so we don’t actually ever get into WWIII, not until the serpent of the New World Order headed by greater ZioNazty Yisrael wills it.

Iraq’s part in this –

The below links show where Saddam Hussein was taken – to Russia – and his generals and families to the United States of America. All of the WMD supplied to Iraq by the TRIAD? That went to Iran and Syria and Lebanon. Read the rest below after reading the link above.

Know this! It is all part of the New World Order plan, based in the European Union with the TRIAD as manipulated outliers to create a false World War III, occurring right now, to enslave the world with a false peace to come in the future and rule from a falsely united Jerusalem as head ensconced upon the European Beast.

Was real Saddam Hussein smuggled out of Iraq by Russia? Who got executed?

India Daily Special Correspondent
Dec. 29, 2006

Was real Saddam Hussein smuggled out of Iraq by Russia? Who got executed?
India Daily Special Correspondent
A Saddam is dead – executed. But who was this Saddam? A look-alike or was it the real Saddam? Was Saddam, the master of all deception that stupid to hang around in Iraq after the invasion?
READ MORE>>

A Saddam is dead – executed. But who was this Saddam? A look-alike or was it the real Saddam? Was Saddam, the master of all deception that stupid to hang around in Iraq after the invasion?

Some international think tank believes the real Saddam was smuggled out of Iraq by the Russian envoy from Iraq to Syria and then to Russia. Americans did shoot at that convoy, injure many – perhaps even the real Saddam but could not catch him.

Some believe the real Saddam is in Russia. That was perhaps the reason the Iraq fell so fast. The Kurds got hold of the Saddam look-alike that was roaming the Iraq with some money like the vagabond of Iraq. They eventually handed this man over to the Americans.

The biggest question is – Saddam really dead? It is up to the America to prove that the man executed was the real Saddam. Common sense says either Saddam was stupid to hang around in Iraq to get killed or he just took off way before the invasion handing the power to many look-alikes he had or he was really smuggled out of Iraq by the Russians during the invasion.

Some point to the DNA and dental records. These are not conclusive evidences. No one knows how it can ever be proved where real Saddam is today – dead or alive!



July 16, 2003: #7250 #7251 JRL Home

#16 – JRL 7250
BBC Monitoring
Intelligence about Saddam behind Russian-US row over Russians’ safety in Baghdad
Source: Channel One TV, Moscow, in Russian 2000 gmt 14 Jul 03

[Presenter Andrey Baturin] A noisy political row has broken out between Moscow and Washington at the weekend. US ambassador in Russia Alexander Verhsbow made several statements, provoking outrage in the Russian Foreign Ministry, which described these statements as inappropriate. The head of the US diplomatic mission said that Russia could have been helpful, rendering assistance by providing intelligence information about the hiding place of Saddam Husayn, his sons and supporters.

In other words, he suggested that Moscow knows where the former dictator is hiding but does not wish to share its information with the US. That is how the US ambassador’s statements can be interpreted. His was almost an accusation: after all, Russia and USA had agreed a long time ago about an exchange of intelligence. And all of a sudden, lo and behold: such a disagreement. Of course, Saddam has many friends in Russia. But that does not mean that Moscow would have taken steps to hide him. Besides, Vershbow warned that the USA did not consider the Russian embassy in Iraq as a diplomatic mission and therefore assumed no responsibility for the safety of its staff. In reply, Moscow reminded

Washington of an example from recent history, when the world community had condemned Iraq’s own attempts during its invasion of Kuwait to shut down missions as well as to deprive their staff of immunity and privileges.

Many questions arise in connection with this issue, above all why precisely at this moment in time, the Americans have decided to refuse the Russian

embassy protection. What has this to do with? We shall discuss these issues with our night-time experts. We have in our studio deputy chairman of the Duma security committee, former FSB director Nikolay [Dmitriyevich] Kovalev. We have also on the line a leading US political scientist in Washington, Ariel Cohen, who is an analyst in the Heritage foundation. Hallo, Mr Cohen.

But before we have our discussion, here is a brief chronology of events surrounding the Russian embassy in Baghdad. Roman Babayan is here with the details.

[Correspondent] The Russian embassy in Baghdad is continuing its work in its usual mode. That was the frequent statement of the Russian Foreign Ministry right before and during the US operation against Iraq. Even a few days prior to the first missile strikes against Baghdad, Russian ambassador Vladimir Titorenko had officially warned that in any event, regardless of how things would develop, Russian diplomats would continue work in Baghdad. True, the ambassador made the reservation that the strength of the diplomatic mission was likely to be reduced, and in the event of a real threat, the possibility of full evacuation from the country will be examined. Titorenko also stated that the embassy had prepared and confirmed a plan for evacuation, under which diplomats would be leaving Iraq via the Iranian border, which is only 220 km from Baghdad. The ambassador said that was the closest and safest route. In the meantime, in the middle of March, the number of embassy of staff was reduced. [Passage omitted: details of departure] By the beginning of the US operation against Iraq, only 26 people, including the ambassador, had continued work. [Passage omitted: more details]. It is noteworthy that at that time the Russian embassy was guarded as a rule by three to five Iraqi soldiers armed with Kalashnikov rifles. [Passage omitted: more details and reiteration] On 6 April, Titorenko was instructed by Moscow to evacuate the remaining staff of the diplomatic mission. Only 12 people remained at the embassy and armed guards. Later 11 embassy staff, the ambassador and the journalists left the country, too. [Passage omitted: known details] The convoy came under attack, with five diplomats having been wounded. One was operated on in Al-Fallujah. A few days later the ambassador helped the wounded one on his way and returned to Baghdad. [Passage omitted]

At present, the Russian embassy continues its work but it is now being protected not by the Iraqi soldiers but by several armoured vehicles of the US army. However, after the statement by Alexander Vershbow, ambassador in Moscow, the post will be removed in the next few days.

[Passage omitted: presenter Cohen comments, making conciliatory utterances]

[Presenter to Kovalev] What do you think if they remove the US posts near the Russian embassy, can the embassy protect itself?

[Kovalev] It will not be able to fully protect itself. I think the situation will lead to a very serious row for the Americans. After Vershbow’s statement about the removal of the guards, if an attack is carried out, I think the row will reach international proportions. Because Russia perceives such statements by the US ambassador as a veiled threat: unless you behave yourselves we

shall not take care of your security, as it were. [Passage omitted: to the same effect]

[Presenter] Now, let us go back to the utterances by the US ambassador, namely, in respect of Russia’s help to find Saddam Husayn. The Americans have not been able to find the former dictator for over three months, who is said to be still in Baghdad. [Passage omitted: video report on US search for Saddam and Cohen’s side of the story] [to Kovalev] Nikolay Dmitriyevich. How beneficial it is for Russia to hide information about Saddam’s hiding place.

[Kovalev] As a matter of fact, this is completely impossible. It is clear that in our situation, in our life today, everything secret can quickly become obvious. So, if such information exists, it will inevitably see the light of day. That is for one thing. If Russia had had such information, it would have immediately been delivered to the USA. Rest assured. There is no doubt about that. [Passage omitted: Cohen says there will be no row]

July 16, 2003: #7250 #7251 JRL Home

Russia tied to Iraq’s missing arms

By                                   12:26 a.m., Thursday, October 28, 2004

Russian special forces troops moved many of Saddam Hussein’s weapons and related goods out of Iraq and into Syria in the weeks before the March 2003 U.S. military operation, The Washington Times has learned.

John A. Shaw, the deputy undersecretary of defense for international technology security, said in an interview that he believes the Russian troops, working with Iraqi intelligence, “almost certainly” removed the high-explosive material that went missing from the Al-Qaqaa facility, south of Baghdad.

“The Russians brought in, just before the war got started, a whole series of military units,” Mr. Shaw said. “Their main job was to shred all evidence of any of the contractual arrangements they had with the Iraqis. The others were transportation units.”

Mr. Shaw, who was in charge of cataloging the tons of conventional arms provided to Iraq by foreign suppliers, said he recently obtained reliable information on the arms-dispersal program from two European intelligence services that have detailed knowledge of the Russian-Iraqi weapons collaboration.

Most of Saddam’s most powerful arms were systematically separated from other arms like mortars, bombs and rockets, and sent to Syria and Lebanon, and possibly to Iran, he said.

The Russian involvement in helping disperse Saddam’s weapons, including some 380 tons of RDX and HMX, is still being investigated, Mr. Shaw said.

The RDX and HMX, which are used to manufacture high-explosive and nuclear weapons, are probably of Russian origin, he said.

Pentagon spokesman Larry DiRita could not be reached for comment.

The disappearance of the material was reported in a letter Oct. 10 from the Iraqi government to the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Disclosure of the missing explosives Monday in a New York Times story was used by the Democratic presidential campaign of Sen. John Kerry, who accused the Bush administration of failing to secure the material.

Al-Qaqaa, a known Iraqi weapons site, was monitored closely, Mr. Shaw said.

“That was such a pivotal location, Number 1, that the mere fact of [special explosives] disappearing was impossible,” Mr. Shaw said. “And Number 2, if the stuff disappeared, it had to have gone before we got there.”

The Pentagon disclosed yesterday that the Al-Qaqaa facility was defended by Fedayeen Saddam, Special Republican Guard and other Iraqi military units during the conflict. U.S. forces defeated the defenders around April 3 and found the gates to the facility open, the Pentagon said in a statement yesterday.

A military unit in charge of searching for weapons, the Army’s 75th Exploitation Task Force, then inspected Al-Qaqaa on May 8, May 11 and May 27, 2003, and found no high explosives that had been monitored in the past by the IAEA.

The Pentagon said there was no evidence of large-scale movement of explosives from the facility after April 6.

“The movement of 377 tons of heavy ordnance would have required dozens of heavy trucks and equipment moving along the same roadways as U.S. combat divisions occupied continually for weeks prior to and subsequent to the 3rd Infantry Division’s arrival at the facility,” the statement said.

The statement also said that the material may have been removed from the site by Saddam’s regime.

According to the Pentagon, U.N. arms inspectors sealed the explosives at Al-Qaqaa in January 2003 and revisited the site in March and noted that the seals were not broken.

It is not known whether the inspectors saw the explosives in March. The U.N. team left the country before the U.S.-led invasion began March 20, 2003.

A second defense official said documents on the Russian support to Iraq reveal that Saddam’s government paid the Kremlin for the special forces to provide security for Iraq’s Russian arms and to conduct counterintelligence activities designed to prevent U.S. and Western intelligence services from learning about the arms pipeline through Syria.

The Russian arms-removal program was initiated after Yevgeny Primakov, the former Russian intelligence chief, could not persuade Saddam to give in to U.S. and Western demands, this official said.

A small portion of Iraq’s 650,000 tons to 1 million tons of conventional arms that were found after the war were looted after the U.S.-led invasion, Mr. Shaw said. Russia was Iraq’s largest foreign supplier of weaponry, he said.

However, the most important and useful arms and explosives appear to have been separated and moved out as part of carefully designed program. “The organized effort was done in advance of the conflict,” Mr. Shaw said.

The Russian forces were tasked with moving special arms out of the country.

Mr. Shaw said foreign intelligence officials believe the Russians worked with Saddam’s Mukhabarat intelligence service to separate out special weapons, including high explosives and other arms and related technology, from standard conventional arms spread out in some 200 arms depots.

The Russian weapons were then sent out of the country to Syria, and possibly Lebanon in Russian trucks, Mr. Shaw said.

Mr. Shaw said he believes that the withdrawal of Russian-made weapons and explosives from Iraq was part of plan by Saddam to set up a “redoubt” in Syria that could be used as a base for launching pro-Saddam insurgency operations in Iraq.

The Russian units were dispatched beginning in January 2003 and by March had destroyed hundreds of pages of documents on Russian arms supplies to Iraq while dispersing arms to Syria, the second official said.

Besides their own weapons, the Russians were supplying Saddam with arms made in Ukraine, Belarus, Bulgaria and other Eastern European nations, he said.

“Whatever was not buried was put on lorries and sent to the Syrian border,” the defense official said.

Documents reviewed by the official included itineraries of military units involved in the truck shipments to Syria. The materials outlined in the documents included missile components, MiG jet parts, tank parts and chemicals used to make chemical weapons, the official said.

The director of the Iraqi government front company known as the Al Bashair Trading Co. fled to Syria, where he is in charge of monitoring arms holdings and funding Iraqi insurgent activities, the official said.

Also, an Arabic-language report obtained by U.S. intelligence disclosed the extent of Russian armaments. The 26-page report was written by Abdul Tawab Mullah al Huwaysh, Saddam’s minister of military industrialization, who was captured by U.S. forces May 2, 2003.

The Russian “spetsnaz” or special-operations forces were under the GRU military intelligence service and organized large commercial truck convoys for the weapons removal, the official said.

Regarding the explosives, the new Iraqi government reported that 194.7 metric tons of HMX, or high-melting-point explosive, and 141.2 metric tons of RDX, or rapid-detonation explosive, and 5.8 metric tons of PETN, or pentaerythritol tetranitrate, were missing.

The material is used in nuclear weapons and also in making military “plastic” high explosive.

Defense officials said the Russians can provide information on what happened to the Iraqi weapons and explosives that were transported out of the country. Officials believe the Russians also can explain what happened to Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction programs.


Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: